Tatsuki Fujimoto Reveals the Real Inspiration Behind Chainsaw Man Being Filled with Demons

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In Chainsaw Man, the villains are complex characters. The devils are basically forces of nature that exist outside of human morality. Devils represent humanity’s villains or adversaries. The story’s major villainous devils really make you question morality and wonder who the true “devils” really are.

Not all devils fight for evil causes though. Some have contracts with humans working for the greater good of society, making those particular devils seem almost heroic, even if that was never their intent.

Then you have devil hybrids who have human intelligence and reasoning but still choose to commit heinous evil acts.

Falling Devil from Chainsaw Man
Falling Devil (Credits: Shonen Jump)

When an interviewer asked Tatsuki Fujimoto about his inspiration for filling Chainsaw Man‘s world with demonic villains, the manga creator gave a surprisingly simple explanation.

He said,

“Because if the opponent isn’t human, I can draw their internal organs. That’s really the only reason.”

That’s quite an interesting choice of art and words, to say the least!

Tatsuki Fujimoto’s Cinematic Inspiration

Tatsuki Fujimoto’s works are full of film references, and he often writes main characters who are huge cinephiles themselves, like Togata from Fire Punch, the leads in Goodbye, Eri, and of course Denji from Chainsaw Man.

Makima in Chainsaw Man
Makima (Credits: MAPPA)

The core concept for Chainsaw Man was directly inspired by the classic American horror film The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

But that infamous slasher flick is far from the only movie or show that influenced Tatsuki Fujimoto’s bizarre, genre-blending storytelling.

He’s cited the overblown disaster parody Sharknado, Quentin Tarantino‘s crime thriller Reservoir Dogs, the wacky horror comedy Attack of the Killer Tomatoes!, and even the somber Japanese drama Typhoon Club as sources of inspiration.

In conclusion, Fujimoto’s choice to populate his story with demons and devils was motivated more by artistic freedom than any deeper symbolism about morality or human nature.

Sometimes a creator’s inspirations are much simpler than fans imagine.



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