Where to see solar eclipse 2024: NASA eclipse map shows best places along path of totality

0
13

We’re a week away from the Great North American Eclipse when people across the continental U.S. will be treated to the wonders of a total solar eclipse. The eclipse will happen on April 8 and will be the last total solar eclipse visible from the contiguous U.S. until Aug. 23, 2044.

A total solar eclipse happens when the moon passes between the sun and Earth, completely blocking the face of the sun. People located in the center of the moon’s shadow – the area known as the path of totality – when it hits Earth will experience a total eclipse, NASA explains.

READ MORE: Solar eclipse on April 8 prompts cell phone warning

While all states in the contiguous U.S. will experience some level of the eclipse, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, as well as small parts of Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee are along the path of totality.

READ MORE: FAA issues warning ahead of April 8 total solar eclipse

In the U.S., the path of totality will start in Texas at 1:27 p.m. CT and will end in Maine at 3:35 p.m. ET (2:25 CT.) In those states, the periods of greatest darkness will reach up to 4 minutes, 27 seconds. You can see NASA’s map showing the path of totality below.

NASA April 8, 2024 eclipse map

Courtesy of NASA.NASA

According to Astronomy.com, people wanting the best views of the eclipse in the U.S. should go to:

  • Radar Base, Texas – 4 minutes, 27 seconds duration of totality, 120.9 miles width of moon shadow
  • Kerrville Texas – 4 minutes 25 second duration of totality, 120.2 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Lampasas, Texas – 4 minutes, 24 seconds duration of totality, 119.7 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Hillsboro, Texas – 4 minutes, 23 seconds duration of totality, 119.2 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Sulphur Springs, Texas – 4 minutes 21 seconds duration of totality, 118.4 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Russellville, Arkansas – 4 minutes, 11 seconds duration of totality, 117.2 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Cape Girardeau, Missouri – 4 minutes, 6 second duration of totality, 115.5 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Vincennes, Indiana – 4 minutes, 5 seconds duration of totality, 114.5 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Indianapolis, Indiana – 3 minutes, 49 seconds duration of totality, 114 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Lima, Ohio – 3 minutes, 51 seconds duration of totality, 113 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Cleveland, Ohio – 3 minutes, 49 seconds duration of totality, 111.9 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Erie, Pennsylvania – 3 minutes, 42 seconds duration of totality, 111.2 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Niagara Falls, New York – 3 minutes, 31 seconds duration of totality, 110.8 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Buffalo, New York – 3 minutes, 45 seconds duration of totality, 110.7 miles width of moon’s shadow
  • Plattsburgh, New York – 3 minutes, 33 seconds duration of totality, 108.4 miles width of moon’s shadow

READ MORE: 7 great national and state parks to view the April 8 eclipse

You can go here to search by ZIP code to how much of the eclipse you will see from where you live.

During the eclipse, the sky will darken as if it were dawn or dusk. Weather permitting, people in the path of totality will be able to see the sun’s corona, or outer atmosphere, which is usually obscured by the bright face of the sun, NASA explains. Outside the path of totality, viewers will see a partial eclipse with the moon covering varying degrees of the sun.

Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here